UNSPECIFIED - MAY 09: In this screengrab, Doja Cat speaks during SHEIN Together Virtual Festival to benefit the COVID – 19 Solidarity Response Fund for WHO powered by the United Nations Foundation on May 09, 2020.

Doja Cat recently received a slew of backlash regarding old videos that resurfaced of the singer-rapper in online chat rooms with white men where she appeared to use the n-word but with a “hard r,” as well as a video where the singer talked negatively about her hair.

Over the weekend, the biracial artist — she is South African and caucasian — took to Instagram to issue a public apology and she also later took to Instagram Live to address the issues in more depth.

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In Doja Cat’s written apology she stated that she has “used public chat rooms to socialize” since she was a child. “I shouldn’t have been on some of those chat room sites, but I personally have never been involved in any racist conversations,” Doja Cat wrote.”I’m sorry to everyone that I offended.”

In the apology letter, Doja Cat also shared more information regarding her race and nationality. “I’m a black woman. Half of my family is black from South Africa and I’m very proud of where I come from,” Doja Cat wrote.

#PressPlay: #DojaCat got on live to apologize and explain some of the controversies surrounding her, thoughts Roomies? #Swipe via @akademiks @dripsaucemedia

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In the video, she stated that she and her team were trying to “protect what’s going on.” “I’m just gonna, one, debunk everything. I have bullet points,” Doja Cat said. “I’m gonna start with “self-hate.”

“I’ve seen tweets about me. It’s a video. It’s not even me. It’s my friends helping me see through a filter the [expletive] on Twitter. I’m not on Twitter. That [expletive] hurts my feelings,” she said. “Seeing people come for me. Some people come for my character Just like any of you guys. It wouldn’t be good, so I avoid social media.”

Doja Cat then went on to say that that’s the reason why her friends have told her what was going on before referring to an old video that resurfaced of the “Say So” singer talking about her “4c” hair. She said that she has a lot of trouble taking care of her hair and that perhaps she shouldn’t have shared that on social media.

“A lot of my friends would agree who has hair like mine that they have a hard time taking care of it,” she explained. “I think that the mistake may have been that I made was saying it on a social platform. Saying it out in public. Maybe being honest about how I feel about taking care of my hair was a bad idea.”

Doja Cat then went on to address the footage that looked like she appeared to use the n-word with a hard r. “I am in no way into race play. I don’t know anyone who does it,” she singer-rapper said. She then explained that the males named Abbott and Preach, who made the video about her know people who are into race play. However, she said that what she appeared to be saying in the video isn’t what happened.

#PressPlay : More clips from #DojaCat 's live where she discusses her dating preferences and saying the "N" word. #Swipe via @akademiks @khleothomas

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Some of the criticism that Doja Cat received was also that she’s been “passed around” the entertainment industry and that she’s only interested in having sex with white men. In the video, Doja Cat said that who she has sex isn’t anybody’s business besides said person(s).

Troubled rapper Tekashi69 recently decided to join the chorus of people criticizing Doja Cat. “She started with the wrong one…give me till tomorrow #canceldoja,” he tweeted on Monday (May 25).

Glennisha Morgan is a Detroit-bred multimedia journalist and writer. She writes about intersectionality, hip-hop, pop culture, queer issues, race, feminism, and her truth. Follow her on Twitter @GlennishaMorgan.